Gizmodo: Undercover Report From Foxconn’s Hell Factory

Too bad we can’t get his kind of info on ALL the products we buy:

Chinese newspaper Southern Weekly sent 20-year-old reporter Liu Zhi Yi undercover in Foxconn’s factory in Shenzhen, China. For 28 days, he experienced dreadful conditions that the factory’s 400,000 employees endure, churning out iPods, iPads, and iPhones for Apple nonstop.

Read more – Undercover Report From Foxconn’s Hell Factory.

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EFF – Facebook Tries to Make Violations of Terms of Use Into Criminal Violations

I used to be afraid of Google. Now, I’m more afraid of Facebook.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is urging a federal judge to dismiss Facebook’s claims that criminal law is violated when its users opt for an add-on service that helps them aggregate their information from a variety of social networking sites.

In a lawsuit against Power Ventures, Facebook claims that Power’s tool violates criminal law because Facebook’s terms of service ban users from accessing their information through “automatic means.”

Accessing information through automatic means is nothing new. Google Reader aggregates feeds from different sites. Seesmic can aggregate your social information from Twitter and Facebook and put it all in one place. Using Facebook’s argument, using something like Seesmic would constitute a criminal violation.

Read more at EFF Seeks to Protect Innovation for Social Network Users | Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Fake PayPal Phishing E-Mail

Spam. We all get them. Some come with attachements that are just viruses or trojans. Some come from folks in Nigeria who want to give us $2000 cash. Some purportedly come from financial institutions looking to verify your info. What we need to remember is that NO bank, NO credit card company, NO financial institution will ever send you an email asking you to click on an embedded link to verify your info. Below is a typical example of such a spam message (one I actually received today). I will also show you how easy it is to spot that it’s a fake.

It apparently came from PayPal. Specifically, security at PayPal.

This message is actually very believable. No misspellings like the usual spam. They even give you a “Reference Number” that looks official. But what you will notice is, if you hover over the link they want you to click (without actually clicking on it), you will see the actual address the link points to. In this case, even though the link says “www.paypal.com”, in the status bar you can see that it actually goes to www.pacificliv.com. If you actually click on the link, you will be brought to a site where you will asked to enter in your paypal credentials. And THAT’S how they get your info and steal your identity. The method is called “phishing”.  It works by basically sending out mass emails to addresses harvested from newgroups, forums, blogs, etc. From the millions of emails that are sent out, some unsuspecting recipients will bite. So be vigilant. Don’t fall for these scams. Never email you info. And when in doubt, simply CALL your financial institution and speak with a customer service representative, directly.